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THE IMPORTANCE OF A SECONDARY EDUCATION

At Bethune Memorial School, there is an emphasis made to all students about the value of completing a full secondary program, which includes providing information regarding all requirements for graduation including the Literacy Requirement and Community Involvement. This information is outlined in this Course Calendar. Bethune Memorial School provides individual courses for students attending an ESL program. In the province of Ontario, students must remain in school, actively engaged in an educational program suited to the student until that student reaches the age of 18 or achieves an Ontario Academy Diploma (OSSD).

The mission of Bethune Memorial School is to ensure students develop a strong sense of identity and achieve academic excellence and become active members of society.

High school is all about preparing you for the "real world". When you wonder if you will ever use the material you learn in your classes, think about the skills that you are learning not just the subject matter. Your listening, note-taking, and information processing skills will help you in so many ways when you go to college or start working on your career. Not only that, high school gives you a chance to grow up mentally, emotionally, and physically.

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

BETHUNE MEMORIAL SCHOOL is a place that helps our students grow spiritually, emotionally, intellectually, and physically to become strong, healthy, positive adults who respect and recognize the rights and dignity of each person and contribute to society.

 

BETHUNE MEMORIAL SCHOOL staff works closely with students, parents and community leaders in the development of curriculum, programs and school procedures that enable the school to meet community aspirations and parental goals.

 

BETHUNE MEMORIAL SCHOOL is an energetic, cheerful, welcoming place, where students and staff feel a sense of belonging and ownership.

 

BETHUNE MEMORIAL SCHOOL assists our students to develop a sense of self-worth, pride in themselves and their culture and teaches Canada values, languages, knowledge, skills, and history to prepare them for self-determination and self-government.

REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT TO PARENTS

A report card will be provided to the student and parent twice per course, one mid-way through the course and one at the end of the course. A report card will be sent to the student's parent(s) and/or guardian by mail after the completion of every course. The original copy will be mailed to the parent/guardian and the student shall receive a photocopy of their grade report. The report card will be issued within 5 business days of the completion of the course in question. The parents/guardian may request a copy of the student’s Ontario Student Transcript (OST). The OST will require up to 3 business days to process.

 

SCHOOL TERM AND TIMETABLE ORGANIZATION

Bethune Memorial School operates on a semester-based program throughout the year. School year start in September and end in June. Summer school is currently not offered.  Subject to change.

 

 

SEMESTER SYSTEM

 

The school year is divided into three semesters:

 

• SEMESTER ONE: September 2018 – January 2019

• SEMESTER TWO: January 2019-June 2019

• Summer July and August

ATTENDANCE

Regular attendance at school is critical for the student’s learning. Where, in the principal’s judgment, a student’s frequent absences from school are jeopardizing his or her successful completion of a course, school staff should meet with the student and the parents to explain the potential consequences of the absences, including failure to gain credits, and discuss steps that could be taken to improve attendance.

 

When a student is under 18, parents/guardians are to phone or present notes to the Administrative regarding absenteeism or lateness. Students under 18 will not be released from school without parental authorization.

 

Expectations for students 18 and over are the same as for all students in terms of rules and regulations. Students 18 years and older may provide their own notes detailing suitable reasons. Schools are obliged to conform to The Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (1989) which means the school cannot share with parents/guardians any aspect of the student’s activity including marks, attendance, etc. without the written consent of the student.

 

Students who miss days (excluding funerals, illnesses or appointments) may lose their credits. Furthermore, students who do not regularly attend school will be withdrawn from the course enrolled. Students are responsible for ensuring that they catch up on any work missed due to their absence from school. Parents are reminded that pulling students out of school during the day is not a practice we encourage. Unexcused absences will be dealt with in the following steps:

 

  • Step1: First five missing hours will be dealt with by the teacher through counseling and phone calls to parents.

  • Step 2: After five missing hour’s school counselor, school administration will meet with the student and make attendance expectations clear, conference with the parents.

 

  • Step3: After 10 missing hours Step2 will be repeated; in addition, school administration will place the student on an attendance contract.

 

  • Step4: After 15 missing hours the student will normally be removed from the course.

LATE AND MISSING ASSIGNMENTS POLICY

It is the policy of Ontario Ministry of Education that schools must make clear to students early in the school year that they are responsible not only for their behavior in the classroom and the school but also for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall expectations within the time frame specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher.

It is the student’s responsibility to complete missed assignments and tests by discussing this with teachers immediately upon the return to school. In the case of examinations, students may be required to provide a doctor’s certificate for an absence.

 

RATIONAL

Students must understand that there will be consequences for n ot completing assignments for evaluation or for submitting those assignments late.

 

GUIDELINES

Bethune Memorial School has developed a policy to address late and missing assignments. Policies will be clearly communicated to all students and parents. This information will be made available in the following ways:

 

  •  School course calendar

  •  The student code of conduct

  •  Course prospectus for all classes

 

Where in the teacher’s professional judgment it is appropriate to do so, a number of strategies may be used to help prevent and/or address late and missed assignments. They include:

 

  • Asking the student to clarify the reason for not completing the assignment;

  • Helping students develop better time-management skills;

  • Collaborating with other staff to prepare apart- or full -year calendar of major  assignment dates for every class;

  • Planning for major assignments to be completed in stages, so that students are less likely to be faced with an all-or-nothing situation at the last minute;

  • Maintaining ongoing communication with students and/or parents about due dates and late assignments, and scheduling conferences with parents if the problem persists;

  • Referring the student to the teacher;

  • Taking into consideration legitimate reasons for missed deadlines;

  • Setting up a student contract;

  • Using counseling or peer tutoring to try to deal positively with problems;

  • Holding teacher-student conferences;

  • Reviewing the need for extra support for English language learners;

  • Reviewing whether students require special education services;

  • Requiring the student to work with a school team to complete the assignment;

  • Providing alternative assignments or tests/exams where, in the teacher’s professional judgment, it is reasonable and appropriate to do so;

Deducting marks for late assignments, up to and including the full value of the assignment.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

The intention of our school Code of Conduct is to assist in providing a safe and effective teaching and learning environment for all. In order to create a safe and effective teaching and learning environment and an atmosphere conducive to the development of our Bethune Memorial School community, it is the students’ responsibility to:

  • Attend school prepared, appropriately dressed, on time, ready to learn;

  • Willingly participate in all class activities;

  • Complete assignments on time

  • Ask permission to leave the classroom for any reason;

  • Show respect for themselves, for others and for all school staff;

  • Support and participate in school activities;

  • Adhere to this Code of Conduct while on any school trip or function;

  • Use language appropriately;

  • Care for all textbooks, equipment, and school property;

  • Leave classrooms, cafeteria and building neat and tidy;

  • Respect the personal property of others;

  • Respect our environment (ecological responsibility)

  • Refrain from bringing anything to school that may compromise safety;

  • Exercise self-discipline, following the established rules and accepting responsibility for his/her actions.

PLAGIARISM POLICY

By definition in The Random House Webster's College Dictionary,

‘Plagiarism' means - " the unauthorized use of the language and thoughts of another and the representation of them as one's own".

To Plagiarizes to - " take ideas, passages, etc. from another’swork by plagiarism”.

This definition includes copying someone else's work in any subject. If you, as a student, do any of the following:

  • Copying/submitting work done by another student,

  • Copying extensively from a text, report, document, or any other resource without proper documentation and then presenting it as your own original work,

  • Using Internet sites to download pre-written essays and reports, then you are plagiarizing.

 

Plagiarism in business and the publishing and entertainment industries are considered legally to be a form of ‘theft'. That is why schools and universities do not accept it either.

Because Bethune Memorial School promotes high-quality education, we believe in offering courses which require students to maintain honest academic practices.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated; therefore - Any student's work that is found to be knowingly and deliberately plagiarized will receive a mark of ‘zero'. The student will be furthermore asked to complete the assignment properly.

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

The Ontario Secondary School program is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they will need to lead satisfying and productive lives after school. The program prepares students for further education, work, and also helps them to become independent, productive, and responsible members of society.

The program typically extends over four years for local Ontario students and students are awarded the Ontario Secondary School Diploma(OSSD) upon successful completion of the program i.e. the earning of 30 credits and meeting the Ministry requirements in the area of community involvement activities and literacy.

All courses offered by Bethune Memorial School have been developed in accordance with the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education.

COMPULSORY SCHOOL AGE REQUIREMENT

The Education Amendment Act (Learning to18), 2006 raised the age of compulsory school attendance in Ontario from 16 to 18 years, or until the student earns an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

THE CREDIT SYSTEM

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. For the purpose of granting a credit, “scheduled time” is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities (other than homework) designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of a course. A credit is granted to a student by the Principal of Bethune Memorial School on behalf of the Minister of Education. A half credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry developed thecourse. Half-credit courses must comply with ministry requirements as outlined in the curriculum policy documents.

ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD) REQUIREMENT

To earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) a student must:

  1. Earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits

  2. Meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement; and

  3. Complete 40 hours of community involvement activities.

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) Requirement

18 compulsory credits:

4

3

2

1

1

1

1

1

0.5

0.5

credits in English (1 credit per grade) *

credits in Mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)

credits in science

credit in Canadian history

credit in Canadian geography

credit in the Arts

credit in health and physical education

credit in French as a second language

credit in career studies

credit in civics

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

group 1: additional credit in English, or French as a second language, ** or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education***

group 2: additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, ** or cooperative education***

group 3: additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language, ** or computer studies, or cooperative education***

In addition, students must complete:

  • 12 optional credits

  • 40 hours of community involvement activities

  • the provincial literacy requirement

 

*A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course.

** In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3.

*** A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. †The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT ACTIVITIES

To graduate, the student must complete a minimum of 40 hours of recorded community volunteer work. These activities may be completed at any time during your years at the Academy.

Volunteer work is work done without pay.

Includes a variety of settings such as in a school, a church, a day care, a recreation program, a tournament, to help with elders, to help with children, to help with a feast, elder's festival or gathering.

It can be done on holidays, weekends, lunch hour or after school.

Includes volunteer work in your home community or at Community Centre.

Does not include any paid work.

Students will maintain and provide a record of their community volunteer activities as follows:

 

A ‘Community Involvement Planning' form may be completed before the student participates in the volunteer activity. The principal will check to see that the activity meets the school's requirements.

Once the student has completed the volunteer activity, they must fill out a ‘Community Involvement Record' form and submit this form to the principal for approval. The number of hours of volunteer work will then be entered into the student's records and placed into their ‘Ontario Student Record’.

APPROVEDCOMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

ACTIVITIES MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

HELP YOUR NEIGHBOURS

  • Provide service to seniors or to others who have difficulty leaving their homes –ranking. Shoveling (no snow blowers), shopping (students should not drive vehicles for this purpose), visiting, reading, meal, preparation

  • Assist a neighbor with child care – take child to park, watch child while parent prepares dinner

  • Tutor younger students – read, take to library, help with homework

HELP YOUR COMMUNITY

  • Volunteer at a seniors’ home/center – visit, read, play cards or board games take seniors for walks crafts

  • Help organize local community events –food drives/banks

  • Take part in environment initiatives – cleaning and recycling operations, park cleanup, planting trees and flower beds (students should not use power tools – lawn mowers, hedge trimmers, wood chippers etc.)

  • Get involved in charitable activities – walk-a-thons, daffodil sales, canvassing for organizations

  • Assist with sports team – community leagues, parks & recreation programs

  • Volunteer in leadership role with community groups – youth groups

  • Volunteer in hospitals, libraries – or any organization recommended by the Volunteer Centre of Toronto

  • Volunteer with social service or animal welfare agencies-Red Cross, United Way, Humane Society

  • Get involved in the democratic political process – scrutineer, canvassing, campaigning

  • Service through religious communities/places of worship

  • Assist with literacy initiatives- at local libraries, day care centers, community centers

  • HELP YOUR SCHOOL OR OTHER SCHOOLS

  • Help with spore’s team – run skills drills, assist coach

  • Help in the library – shelving books, tidying up, changing bulletin boards

  • Tutor other students – help with homework, review difficult concepts assist students with special needspeer buddy

  • Assist with planning of arts or athletic events – do publicity, set up for track meets, sell tickets, attend coat check, offer technical support

  • Facilitate school events such as parent information nights – meet and greet visitors, give guided tours, serve refreshments

  • Assist with environment activities – encourage recycling, plant trees, flowers, work on grounds crew (students should not use power tools)

  • Participate in charitable initiatives – food drives, holiday drives for toys of food

  • Sit on school councils, committees – school governance, be a peer mentor/mediator. Help with orientation of Grade 9 students

LIST OF INELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

 

The Ministry of Education has developed a list of activities that may NOT be chosen as community involvement activities and that are therefore ineligible activities. An ineligible activity is an activity that:

  • Is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (e.g., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience);

  • Takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student’s lunch breaks or “spare) periods is permissible;

  • Take place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under sixteen years of age;

  • Takes place in a factory, if the student is under fifteen years of age;

  • Take place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;

  • Is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled (e.g., cooperative education portion of a course, job shadowing, work experience);

  • Takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day. However, an activity that takes place during the student’s lunch breaks or “spare) periods is permissible;

  • Take place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under sixteen years of age;

  • Takes place in a factory, if the student is under fifteen years of age;

  • Take place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;

  • Would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace (students are not to replace paid workers or be paid themselves);

  • Involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools, or scaffolding;

  • Involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons;

  • Involves handling of substances classed as designated substances under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;

  • Requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;

  • involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewelry, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;

  • consists of duties normally performed in the student’s home (i.e., daily chores) or personal recreational activities;

  • involves a court - ordered program (e.g., community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

INSURANCE

BMS’s liability insurance will protect the students and the community sponsors for liability lawsuits that may arise from the students’ activities in this program. The school’s insurance does not cover the sponsors for lawsuits that arise from their negligence or for student injuries in the workplace. It is recommended that students involved in the program purchase Student Accident Insurance. BMS assumes no liability beyond 40 hours.

BMS and its employees, including the school contact, will not be liable or responsible for any injury to a student, or loss or damage to personal property as a result of a students’ participation in the activity.

SUBSTITUTIONS FOR COMPULSORY COURSES

To provide the flexibility to tailor an individual student’s program to the student’s needs and to support his or her progress through secondary school, principals may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements (including Groups 1, 2 and 3). Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to respond to special needs and interests. Appropriate documentation will be placed in the OSR when a course substitution has been made.

TRANSFER COURSES

Transfer courses are partial-credit courses that bridge the gap between two different types within the same subject and grade. You may change course type by taking a transfer course. For example, if you complete Grade 9 applied mathematics, you may take Grade 10 academic mathematics after completing a transfer course. The transfer courses are also offered if you wish to change course types between Grade 10 and 11 or Grade 11 and 12 courses in Mathematics.

 

A student wishing to change course types between Grades 10 and 11 and/or Grades 11 and 12 must fulfill one of the following requirements:

  1. Complete the designated course prerequisite

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) requirements

CHANGING COURSE TYPE

If a student wishes to change direction or pathway in their program they may do so providing that the prerequisite for the newly chosen course is first taken by the student. The principal may also waive a prerequisite as described earlier in the Course Calendar.

COURSE ADD AND DROP PROCEDURE

All course changes, additions, and deletions must be made in consultation with teachers, parents, and Principal of Bethune Memorial School. A timetable change is not official unless approved through this process. Note: if a student in Grade 11 and 12 receives permission to withdraw from a course after the deadline, the student’s percentage grade at the time of withdrawal will be entered in the OST and a “W” will appear in the “credit earned” column of the OST. For students who have withdrawn from a course after five instructional days following the issue of the first provincial report card, the student’s percentage grade at the time of withdrawal is entered into the OST.

REPITITION OF A COURSE LOAD

Students who repeat a Grade 11 or 12 courses that they have previously completed successfully earn only one credit for the course. However, each attempt and the percentage grade obtained is recorded on the OST and an ‘R’ is entered in the Credit column for the course(s) with the lower percentage.

A full-time student will likely take two credits each term. Under special circumstances, an application may be made to the Principal to take one additional credit during September – June school year.

COURSE LOAD

THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL

LITERACY GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

All students must pass the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) in order to earn an Ontario Academy Diploma. Students will usually take the literacy test in Grade 10. The test is based on the reading and writing skills that students should have acquired from Kindergarten to Grade 9.


For the 2018 – 2019 school year the Ontario Literacy Test will be written on March. Students who are required to write this test must be in school for that day.

 

The test will serve both to determine whether students have acquired the skills considered essential for reading and writing, and to provide confirmation that those students who have completed the test successfully have attained the provincial expectations for reading and writing. The test will identify those students who have not demonstrated the required skills and will identify areas in which these students need remediation.

Accommodations, Special Provisions, Deferrals, and exemptions

The necessary accommodations will be made to ensure that students who are receiving special education programs and services and who have an Individual Education Plan have a fair and equal opportunity to successfully complete the test. The Principal, in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff, may request a deferral (for ESL or ELD students) or an exemption only if the IEP indicates that the student is not working towards anAcademy Diploma.


Alpha will provide remedial assistance for students who do not complete the test successfully. This assistance will be designed to help students improve their skills so that they are better prepared to retake the test.

Ontario Literacy Course (OLC4O)


Students, who have been eligible to write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) at least once, and have been unsuccessful at least once, are eligible to take the Ontario Literacy Course (OLC4O) to achieve both a Grade 12 credit and their literacy credential for graduation. In addition, the school principal may, in special circumstances, grant a student the right to take the OLC4O course as a substitution for the test after one unsuccessful attempt, as long as the student is in grade 11 or 12 and has the permission of the parent(s)/guardian(s).


This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Academy Literacy Test. Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a literacy portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATE (OSSC)

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided they have earned a minimum of 14 credits distributed as follows:


Compulsory credits (totalof7):
 

2 credits in English
1 credit in Canadian geography or Canadian history
1 credit in mathematics
1 credit in science
1 credit in health and physical education
1 credit in the Arts or technological education Optional credits (total of 7)
7 credits selected by the student from available courses

THE CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT

Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included.

THE CREDIT SYSTEM

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a full credit course, which is scheduled for 110 hours. All credit courses are subject to inspection by the Ministry of Education. (See section 8 for course offerings)


COURSE SELECTION


In each year, students are advised to select courses with their educational and career goals in mind. A program should be built to include the required subjects and be chosen at the most appropriate level of difficulty. All Grade 9, 10 and 11 students are required to take 4 courses per semester.


COURSE CHANGES


If you wish to change from one course to another, you will have two weeks at the beginning of each semester to do so. You will require approval from your teacher and the principal. Please see the guidance office on how to go about making course changes.


COURSE WITHDRAWALS


Withdrawal 5 days after the designated date for mid-term report card distribution from any Grade 11 or 12 courses will be recorded on the OST.

 

ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD (OSR)

 

The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the record of a student’s educational progress through schools in Ontario. The Education Act requires that the principal of a school collect information “for inclusion in a record in respect of each pupil enrolled in the school and to establish, maintain, retain, transfer and dispose of the record”. The act also regulates access to an OSR and states that the OSR is “privileged for the information and use of supervisory officers and the principal and teachers of the school for the improvement of instruction” of the student. Each student and the parent(s) of a student who is not an adult (that is, a student who is under the age of eighteen) must be made aware of the purpose and content of, and have access to, all of the information contained in the OSR.


PLANNING A PROGRAM


Use the Credit Counselling Summary to track the compulsory and optional credits you have earned and to make a note of the ones you need to take to earn your diploma. Please contact the Principal for assistance.

SECONDARY SCHOOL COURSES

Secondary school courses in the Ontario curriculum are organized by discipline, grade, and course type. Course types offered in Grades 9 and 10 (academic and applied courses, open courses) differ from those offered in Grades 11 and 12 (destination-related courses, open courses).

TYPES OF COURSES

GRADES 9 AND 10 COURSES


Four types of courses are offered in grades 9 - 10: Academic courses, Applied courses, Open courses, and Locally Developed Courses.


ACADEMIC COURSES


Academic courses are intended to prepare students for university preparation courses in grades 11 and 12. Students, who are interested in attending college after completion of high school, should take academic courses in grades 9 and 10. Academic courses emphasize theory and abstract problems.


APPLIED COURSES


Applied courses are intended to prepare students for college preparation courses in grades 11 and 12. Students, who are interested in attending college, should take applied level courses. Applied level courses focus on practical applications.


OPEN COURSES


Open courses offered in all Academy grades are designed to prepare students for further study in certain subjects and to enrich their education. These courses are ‘open' to all students and include subjects outside the core areas of mathematics, science, social studies, and English. Like the other streams of courses, open courses are credit-based and are counted toward the 30 credits required to earn an Ontario Academy Diploma.


LOCALLY DEVELOPED COMPULSORY CREDIT COURSES


These courses are for Grades 9 and 10 English, Math and Science, Grade 9 Geography and Grade 10 History. They further develop knowledge and skills in these subject areas.

In Grade 11 and 12, there are four types of courses offered:

 

  • University Preparation Courses

  • College/University Preparation Courses

  • College Preparation Courses

  • Workplace Preparation Courses

UNIVERSITY PREPARATION COURSES


University Preparation courses are intended to give students the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. These courses are challenging and emphasize theory.


UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSES


University/College Preparation courses prepare students for entry into either university or college. This stream of courses will be offered in only some subject areas in grades 11 and 12.


COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSES


College Preparation Courses prepare students for entry into most college programs.These courses are more ‘activity based’ than the University Preparation courses.


WORKPLACE PREPARATION COURSES


Workplace Preparation Courses are designed to prepare students for direct entry into the workplace or for admission to apprenticeship programs and other training programs offered in the community. Workplace Preparation courses do not meet entrance requirements for college or university programs.

UNDERSTANDING COURSE CODE AND DESCRIPTIONS


Course Descriptor
ENG1P = English, Grade 9 Applied
Major Subject Areas are alphabetically organized in the Course Descriptor section.

THE CREDIT SYSTEM

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a full credit course, which is scheduled for 110 hours. All credit courses are subject to inspection by the Ministry of Education. (See section 8 for course offerings)


Course Selection


In each year, students are advised to select courses with their educational and career goals in mind. A program should be built to include the required subjects and be chosen at the most appropriate level of difficulty. All Grade 9, 10 and 11 students are required to take 4 courses per semester.


Course Changes


If you wish to change from one course to another, you will have two weeks at the beginning of each semester to do so. You will require approval from your teacher and the principal. Please see the guidance office on how to go about making course changes.


Course Withdrawals


Withdrawal 5 days after the designated date for mid-term report card distribution fromany Grade 11 or 12 courses will be recorded on the OST.

 

P.L.A.R. (Prior Learning Assessment Recognition):


Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is now in effect to help students achieve recognition for their prior learning towards completion of diploma requirements. Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside Academy. Where such learning has occurred outside Ontario classrooms, students enrolled in Ontario and inspected private schools may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the Academy diploma. This formal evaluation and accreditation process is known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR). PLAR procedures are carried out under the direction of the school Principal, who grants credits.


In accordance with the Ministry of Education for Prior Learning Assessment Recognition (PLAR) students who enter Bethune Memorial School from out-of-province high schools at which they have earned high school credits are eligible to be granted credit equivalencies toward the Ontario Academy Diploma. Upon receipt of an official transcript from the student’s previous school, the Principal will determine the number of equivalency credits to be granted. This information will be recorded on an Bethune Memorial School Credit Equivalency Report which will be saved electronically and placed in the student’s OSR. The equivalency credits will subsequently be added to an Ontario Student Transcript according to the guidelines set out in the Ontario Student Transcript Manual. At present, Bethune Memorial School does not accept credit challenges as part of the PLAR process.


The PLAR process involves:


Grade 9 and Grade 10 individual assessment/equivalency process


Grade 11 and 12 equivalency processes


In all cases, the knowledge and skills gained through education, work experience, and training must be directly related to the provincial curriculum expectations. By using this process, mature students may be granted up to 26 credits toward their OSSD. A mature student must still complete a minimum of four Grade 11 or Grade 12 credits after becoming a mature student, no matter how many equivalent credits are granted. Post-secondary study that is part of a diploma or degree program cannot be counted toward an Academy diploma.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflect how well students are achieving the curriculum expectations. The primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. As part of the assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement.


Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s work on the basis of established performance standards and assigning a value to represent that quality. Evaluation is based on an assessment of learning that provides evidence of student achievement at strategic times throughout the grade/course, often at the end of a period of learning. 70% of the evaluation is based on classroom work and may be determined through a variety of methods such as ongoing class demonstrations, presentations, essays, performances and classroom tests, and quizzes. 30% of the evaluation is based on a final summative evaluation that may be determined through a variety of methods in the latter portion of the course. These could include a portfolio, essay, examination and/or demonstration. In Ontario Secondary Schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade.


Assessment and evaluation will be based on the provincial curriculum expectations and the achievement levels outlined in the secondary curriculum policy documents.

EVALUATION

Evaluation is based on the ability of students to meet very specific expectations listed for each course. Students' marks are determined as a result of their knowledge and skill development as reflected in:

 

  • Daily work;

  • Oral and written work, reports, assignments;

  • Projects, essays, assignments;

  • Tests, quizzes, examinations

  • The consistency of completed work


It is expected that all essays, projects, and assignments are completed by the due date. The final 30% of the mark of each course will comprise of various combinations of:

 

  • An exam,

  • Projects,

  • Presentations, or

  • Culminating activities.


Because each course has its own specific guidelines with regards to evaluation, students and parents are invited to visit or call the school to discuss the contents of the course guideline.


Students will be provided with a summary of the course outline prior to the commencement of the course. Parents also have the right to request a copy of the course summary.


Achievement Levels


Levels of achievement of the curriculum expectations are described in detail in the achievement charts in the Secondary Curriculum policy documents. The charts are organized into broad categories of knowledge and skills and provide detailed descriptions of each level of achievement. While they are broad in scope and general in nature, the achievement levels serve as a guide for gathering assessment information and a framework within which to assess and evaluate each student’s achievement. As such, they enable teachers to make consistent judgments about the quality of students’ work and to provide clear and specific information about their achievement to students and their parents. It is expected that both mathematical calculations and professional judgment will inform the determination of percentage marks. The levels of achievement are associated with percentage grades, and are defined as follows:

  • 80 - 100% - Level 4: A very high to outstanding level of achievement. Achievement is above the provincial standard.

  • 70 -79% - Level 3: A high level of achievement. Achievement is at the provincial standard

  • 60 - 69% Level 2: A moderate level of achievement. Achievement is below, but approaching, the provincial standard.

  • 50 -59% Level 1: A passable level of achievement. Achievement is below the provincial standard.

  • Below 50%: Insufficient achievement of the curriculum expectations. The student will not receive a credit for the course.


Procedures for Communicating Student Achievement


The information on student achievement should be communicated to students and parents at regular intervals and in a variety of informal and formal ways. Informal communication of student achievement includes ongoing feedback to students throughout the course, as well as feedback to parents during parent-teacher conferences and at other appropriate times. The Provincial Report Card, Grades 9–12, is the formal instrument used to communicate student achievement to parents.  Parents are encouraged to contact teachers or Guidance Counsellors regarding concerns about student achievement.

The Provincial Report Card, Grades 9–12


Student achievement must be communicated formally to students and parents by means of the Provincial Report Card, Grades 9–12. The report card documents the student’s achievement in every course, in the form of a percentage grade. It also includes teachers’ comments on the student’s strengths and weaknesses, specifying the areas in which improvement is needed and the ways in which it might be achieved. The report card contains separate sections for recording attendance and for evaluating the student’s learning skills in every course.

Report Cards


An official report card will be issued to students and parents on the following dates:
 

First Semester
Mid-Term Marks—November2018
Final Marks—January 2019

 

Second Semester
Mid-Term Marks—April 2019
Final Marks—June 2019

STUDENT RECORDS

ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD


The school must maintain an Ontario Student Record (OSR) folder for each student. This folder contains the complete academic history of the student. Any student has the right to examine his/her record, as does the parent or guardian of any student who has not yet reached the age of 18. If a parent of an adult student (over 18) wishes to examine their child's OSR, they must obtain their son’s/daughter's permission. These records are protected by the Education Act and freedom of information legislation.

 

ONTARIO STUDENT TRANSCRIPT


The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) provides a comprehensive record of a student's overall achievement in high school. The credits that a student has earned toward the fulfillment of the requirements for the graduation diploma are recorded on the OST. It will include:

 

  • The student's achievement in all grades and credits gained for successfully completed courses,

  • Identification of any course that has been substituted for one that is a diploma requirement,

  • Confirmation that the student has completed the community involvement requirement,

  • The student's final result on the provincial Academy literacy test,

  • A special indicator of any extraordinary circumstances affecting the student's achievement in a Grade 11 or 12 courses,

  • Equivalent credits granted based on the principal's evaluation of their previous learning, i.e. out of province credits or not-inspected the private school,

  • Repeated Grade 11 or 12 courses that students have previously failed.

Full Disclosure for Grades 11 and 12


The Ministry of Education has a policy of full disclosure. This policy states that all grade11 and 12 courses attempted by students must be recorded on Ontario Student Transcript. Full disclosure does not apply to students in grades 9 or 10. Any grade 11or 12 courses completed, dropped, or failed will appear on a student transcript along with the marks earned in the program. Full disclosure will take effect five (5) instructional days following the issue of the Mid-Term Provincial report card.

GUIDANCE COUNSELLOR / PRINCIPAL

The School has a Guidance Counsellor who can help you with your course selection and answer your questions. We suggest that you review the current diploma requirements before you contact us for assistance.


The following guidance services area variable for students enrolled in at the School:

 

  • Assessment of secondary school diploma requirements

  • Assistance with College/University application process

  • Educational planning and counseling

  • Evaluations for mature students or equivalent credits

  • Prior Learning Assessment & Recognition (PLAR) for mature students who are enrolled in a secondary school credit program for the purpose of obtaining an OSSD

  • The out-of-province document evaluation


Requesting a Progress Report, Transcript, or Enrolment Confirmation


If you would like the School to provide a transcript of your marks to you or to a college or university, you must fill in and sign a Request for Transcript Form. Your transcript will be issued after you have successfully completed the course and the mark has been recorded. Your transcript will be mailed, unless you specify that you want to pick It up in person. We cannot fax transcripts.


These documents are provided only on request. If you want the School to send a progress report, transcript, or enrolment confirmation letter directly to an institution or employer, your request must include

 

  • Your student numbers

  • The name and address of the institution or employer to whom you want the document mailed

  • The contact name at the institution or employer

  • (If applicable) the reference number of your file at the institution

Please note that we need at least two business days to prepare these documents, not including time in the mail. We will mail one copy of the document to the address you indicate and one copy to you for your records.


University Requirements and University Admission Process


Ontario Universities require that candidates complete the requirements, including the OSSD and a minimum of six Grade 12 courses. These are generally coded ‘4U’. However, a maximum of two ‘4M’ courses may be included among the six required for Ontario university admission. The average for admission is based on the student’s best six marks, one of which must be Grade 12 English (ENG4U). Specialized university programs such as Engineering and Commerce may have specific prerequisites that stipulate that certain Grade 12 subjects must be put forward in the calculation of the average for admission purposes. Some students may also be required to present proof of English facility. Detailed requirements can be found at www.ouac.on.ca.


In December, students make formal application to the Ontario universities of their choice. They may amend their choices until the middle of February. Bethune Memorial School will input marks date to Ontario University Application Centre (OUAC) on behalf of the student.

Issuing Report Cards for Part-time Students


If you are currently registered as a full-time student in a public or private high school and wish to obtain additional credits, Bethune Memorial School offers a part-time program which allows you to take up to one course per term. These courses may be taken for the first time or as retake courses. Upon completion of the course, an official report card will be mailed to your full-time school to be added to your student records. Please note that each course will cover material outlined by the respective Ontario Curriculum and is subject to the same required prerequisites.


Issuing Diplomas


The School will issue the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) if you earned your last credit with us.

 

Individual Education Plan (IEP)


As a student proceeds through Bethune Memorial School, course selections will be made which reflect changing personal interests as well as career aspirations. Each student is encouraged to use and to regularly update, an Individual Pathway Plan which causes one to systematically reflect upon those interests and to plan courses and their prerequisites such that they can be fulfilled. Course planning charts are available in Student Services to help students in planning their pathways.


Access to Courses of Study


The course of study is available at the school for parents’ perusal. These courses of study have been developed according to the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education. During the school year, parents can make direct contact with teachers regarding courses of study, marks policy and evaluation methods for specific courses. An outline of the courses and evaluation methods will be given to all students at the beginning of each course. Course outlines are kept in the office and may be viewed upon request.


Access to Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents


Ontario curriculum policy documents are also available upon written request. The documents are also on the Ministry of Education website http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/index.html

The Ontario Student Record Folder (OSR)


An Ontario Student Record Folder is established/maintained for each student enrolled as a full-time student at Bethune Memorial School. The Ontario Student Record Folder (OSR) includes Ontario Student Transcript (OST), exact copies of Report Cards and Documentation File, if applicable. The OSR contains information on bibliographical data, schools previously attended, parent’s information, special health
information, photographs, information on school activities and other information, if applicable.

 

Experiential Learning Programs


Experiential learning programs may be part of the delivery of the curriculum in all disciplines. Experiential learning programs include job shadowing and job twinning, work experience, and cooperative education.

 

Cooperative education programs allow students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community.

 

Work experience is a component of a course that provides students with a learning opportunity in the workplace for a limited period of time.


Job shadowing allows a student to spend one-half to one day observing a worker in a specific occupation. Job twinning provides the opportunity for the student to observe a cooperative education student at his or her placement for one-half to one day.

Currently, Bethune Memorial School does not offer experiential learning programs.


Accommodations for Students taking courses in English As A Second Language


A request for accommodation for ESL students may be made at anytime during acourse. Once your request has been reviewed, our Guidance Counsellor will contact you regarding the outcome. At that time, you will be informed what, if any, accommodation can be provided to meet your needs.

 

Here are examples of their individualized accommodations that the School can offer:

 

  • Giving students extra time to complete assignments or write tests

  • Allowing the use of certain learning tools, like calculators for completing numeracy tasks and computers for word processing

  • Administering tests individually or in small groups

  • Providing a quiet environment in which assessment may take place

  • Permitting oral responses to test questions

  • Providing for the use of scribes for tests

  • Simplifying the language of instructions and questions used in tests

SCHOOL FACILITIES

LIBRARY


The school will have available a set of core textbooks in each subject area. For research purposes, the students will avail themselves of the resources available at the local community library.


COMPUTER ROOM and Laboratory


Technology may be used by the students to complete assignments and to do research. Students may use their private notebook on the school’s wireless network system.


Grades 9—12 Courses Offered at Our School


All courses offered at BETHUNE MEMORIAL SCHOOL meet the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education. The following is a list of grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 courses offered at our school and their descriptions.

Course Descriptions
For Course Outlines

Grade 12 to 10

ESL


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12: English as a Second Language and English Literacy Development, 2007 (revised)


ESL Level 1


ESLAO


This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce them to the English language and help them adjust to the diversity in their new environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for every- day and essential academic purposes. They will engage in short conversations using basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.


Prerequisite: None


ESL Level 2


ESLBO


This course extends students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English for every- day and academic purposes. Students will participate in conversations in structured situations on a variety of familiar and new topics; read a variety of texts designed or adapted for English language learners; expand their knowledge of English grammatical structures and sentence patterns; and link English sentences to compose paragraphs. The course also supports students’ continuing adaptation to the Ontario school system by expanding their knowledge of diversity in their new province and country.


Prerequisite: ESL Level 1 or equivalent

ESL Level 3


ESLCO


This course further extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom oral presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of text forms. As well, students will expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate their transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian issues.


Prerequisite: ESL Level 2 or equivalent

ESL Level 4


ESLD0


This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral-presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in 63 discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.


Prerequisite: ESL Level 3 or equivalent


ESL Level 5


ESLEO


This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.


Prerequisite: ESL Level 4 or equivalent

Grade 12

BUSINESS STUDIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Business Studies, 2006 (revised)

International Business Fundamentals


BBB4M


This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.


Prerequisite: None


Business Leadership Management Fundamentals


BOH4M


This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business.


Students will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.


Prerequisite: None


ENGLISH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: English, 2007 (revised)


ENG4U


This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater
control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.


Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 12: Health and Physical Education, 2015 (revised)


Introductory Kinesiology

PSK4U


This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sport, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation, and sports administration.


Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/college preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 course in health and physical education


MATH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Mathematics, 2007 (revised)


Calculus and Vectors


MCV4U


This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.


Note: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)


Advanced Functions

MHF4U

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.


Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation


Mathematics of Data Management


MDM4U


This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.


Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications, Grade 11,


University/College Preparation

SCIENCE


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Science, 2008 (revised)


Biology


SBI4U


This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.


Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation


Chemistry

SCH4U


This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.


Prerequisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation


Physics


SPH4U


This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.


Prerequisite: Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation


SOCIAL SCIENCES and HUMANITIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 12: Social Sciences and Humanities, 2013 (revised)

Nutrition and Health


HFA4U


This course examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health 120 and disease. Students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

 

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies.


COMPUTER STUDIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Computer Studies, 2008 (revised)

Computer Science,


ICS4U


This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field.

 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation

Grade 11


BUSINESS

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Business Studies, 2006 (revised)


Financial Accounting Fundamental


BAF3M


This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.


Prerequisite: None


COMPUTER STUDIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 10 and 12: Computer Studies, 2008 (revised)


Introduction to Computer Science


ICS3U


This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.


Prerequisite: None


ENGLISH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12:English, 2007 (revised)


ENG3U


This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.


Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

MATH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Mathematics, 2007 (revised)


Functions


MCR3U


This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason
mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.


Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic


SCIENCE


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Science, 2008 (revised)


Biology


SBl3U


This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.


Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic


Chemistry


SCH3U


This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.


Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

SOCIAL SCIENCES and HUMANITIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 12: Social Sciences and Humanities, 2013 (revised)


Food and Nutrition


Food and Culture


HFC3M


This course focuses on the flavours, aromas, cooking techniques, foods, and cultural traditions of world cuisines. Students will explore the origins of and developments in diverse food traditions. They will demonstrate the ability to cook with ingredients and equipment from a variety of cultures, compare food-related etiquette in many countries and cultures, and explain how Canadian food choices and traditions have been influenced by other cultures. Students will develop practical skills and apply social science research methods while investigating foods and food practices from around the world.


Prerequisite: None


The ARTS


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: The Arts, 2010 (revised)


Drama


ADA3M


This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences.


Prerequisite: Drama, Grade 9 or 10, Open


Media Arts


ASM3M


This course focuses on the development of media arts skills through the production of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as new media, computer animation, and web environments. Students will explore the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process to produce effective media art works, and critically analyse the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values.

Prerequisite: Media Arts, Grade 10, Open


Visual Arts


AVI3M


This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emerging technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g., photography, video, computer graphics, information design).


Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open

Grade 10

CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Canadian and World Studies, 2013 (revised)
 

Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic

 

CHC2D


This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different individuals, groups, and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities, in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on identities, citizenship, and heritage in Canada. Students will develop an understanding of some of the political developments and government policies that have had a lasting impact on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and communities. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.


Prerequisite: None


Note: This course description reflects the revisions that have been made to the history courses as part of Ontario’s curriculum strategy in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action numbers 62 and 63.


Civils and Citizenship


CHV2O


Credit 0.5


This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community.
Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range 41 of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.


Prerequisite: None


GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Guidance and Career Education, 2006 (revised)

Career Studies


GLC2O


Credit 0.5


This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.


Prerequisite: None


Note: This course is currently being revised and updated. More information to follow at a later date.


COMPUTER STUDIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 10 and 12: Computer Studies, 2008 (revised)


Introduction to Computer Studies


ICS2O


This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking, and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies, and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers.

 

Prerequisite: None


MATH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Mathematics, 2005 (revised)


Academic


MPM2D


This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problemsolving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multistep problems. 98

Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic, or Grade 9 Mathematics Transfer, Applied to Academic


SCIENCE


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Science, 2008 (revised)


Academic


SNC2D


This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.


Prerequisite: Science, Grade 9, Academic or Applied


SOCIAL SCIENCES and HUMANITIES


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 12: Social Sciences and Humanities, 2013 (revised)


Exploring Family Studies


HIF2O


This course explores, within the context of families, some of the fundamental challenges people face: how to meet basic needs, how to relate to others, how to manage resources, and how to become responsible members of society. Students will explore adolescent development and will have opportunities to develop interpersonal, decision-making, and practical skills related to daily life. They will learn about the diverse ways in which families function in Canada and will use research skills as they explore topics related to individual and family needs and resources.


Prerequisite: None


The ARTS


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: The Arts, 2010 (revised)


Drama

ADA2O


This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences.

 

Prerequisite: None


Media Arts


ASM2O


This course enables students to create media art works by exploring new media, emerging technologies such as digital animation, and a variety of traditional art forms such as film, photography, video, and visual arts. Students will acquire communications skills that are transferable beyond the media arts classroom and develop an understanding of responsible practices related to the creative process. Students will develop the skills necessary to create and interpret media art works.


Prerequisite: None


Visual Arts


AVI2O


This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to reflect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.


Prerequisite: None


MATH


The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Mathematics, 2005 (revised)


Academic


MPM1D


This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of threedimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

 

SCIENCE

 

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Science, 2008 (revised)


Academic


SNC1D


This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity.

 

Prerequisite: None